Diary and Symptom Tracker (Charcoal)

5 reviews

$64.95

Made in Australia this hybrid diary and symptom tracker has been designed by Spoonies for Spoonies.

Use this discrete A5 sized journal daily to record & track your illness and symptoms. 

This 12 month diary features both daily and monthly tracking pages which aid in monitoring a range of symptoms including pain, fatigue, anxiety as well as lifestyle behaviours comprising of food intake, exercise and libido. This allows you to recognise trends and potential triggers for your symptoms and illness. 

A great resource to bring to appointments as it makes it easy to access your information in only a few moments. Not only does it have space to record your medical team, you can also record all your medications & past or upcoming surgeries and procedures. 

Another amazing thing about the diary is the kick ass illustrations done by the very talented Chan Sondhu Designs to give this diary some colour and put a smile on your face.

We can't give away all of our secret's but we can't wait for you to start using this amazing diary!

Designed & manufactured in Australia

Since this isn't timely to any year, you can start using this diary at any day, just flick to today's date and off you go!

For example - if you purchase on FRIDAY October 2nd 2020, you can flick over to October 2nd and start using it. If you purchased on SATURDAY October 2nd 2021 you can still use this same diary as the day of the week isn't listed in the diary - Just the date!

Customer Reviews
5.0 Based on 5 Reviews
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A
02/02/2021
Anonymous
Australia Australia
I recommend this product

Absolutely love this! It's exactly what I have been wanting to help keep a track of things.

MD
20/12/2020
Mark D.
Australia Australia
A hybrid diary/symptom tracker? Why?

Well, if you know, you know. If you’re reading this and you know about Spoonies, you probably already have some method of recording your symptoms. (I’ve used an ordinary diary (Faber Poetry Diary) for six years. Not ideal.) If you don’t, tracking symptoms helps you recognise trends and identify triggers as well as providing a record to show your medical team. BUT – it also gives you a great outlet and a sense of control. Making an entry after a tough day then slamming the book shut, puts a lid on your nemesis. And if it’s been a great day, leaving that page open is like singing to the World! This diary/tracker is described as a “discreet A5 sized journal”. It may be discreet because it is a tasteful black or grey, with a large gold debossed Spoonies logo on the front and The Spoonies Society printed in gold on the spine. However, it is 3cm thick and weighs 770gms, so it’s not something to quickly slip into your hand/man bag when you’re off to the café. But it’s not designed for that. It may go with you on visits to your doctor, but mostly it will live at home. At first glance the price ($64 + shipping) seems expensive. It’s not. Compared to other journals of similar size and production quality, this journal is actually good value. Considering the excellent cover and binding quality, the 450-ish pages, the clear print on bright white paper and all the consideration involved in developing the charts, tables and data spaces, the price is very reasonable indeed. And then – it’s made in Australia! Inscope Books really have done a fine job with the Spoonies journal. It’s a solid book and will take a lot of use. Just as well, because it’s made to last for a whole year. Each entry point shows dates, but not days, so it can be used in any year, or if you buy it in April 2021, you can use it for the full twelve months into 2022. Each day has a full-page entry, and there are full month’s tracker summary charts and a calendar-type over-view. These latter sections are useful as summaries, but actually work to help you maintain daily entries – something that can be hard when you’re feeling low. Clear images of the pages are shown on the website. Importantly, when opened each double page lies flat (thank you Inscope binders), making it easy to write your entries. You don’t have to press the book open with one hand and scribble with the other. There are headings to guide you, but how you record is up to you. Use numbers, percentages, colour in boxes, etc. Writing in points keeps your record concise and clear to follow. It’s not hard to adapt a chart or data box if the heading doesn’t suit you, however, the designers seem to have thought of almost everything and taken into consideration the wide variety of Spoonies out there. Are there negatives? Well, a few minor ones. The journal has a female slant, but this is subtle and will be no problem at all for males who need a symptom tracker. For instance, I will simply adapt the ************ tracker to something else. A thin ribbon bookmark bound in would be nice, even though there is a card bookmark supplied. The biggest issue for me – and it is probably not a problem for anyone else in the universe – is that the beautiful white paper is not fountain pen friendly. It soaks up ink like blotting paper and the bleed through is significant. I had thought of using bright coloured inks, but even the palest of inks shows through. So, I’ll be using a Pilot Frixion pen in light blue, which shows up beautifully against the grey-black print. I’ve attached it using an inexpensive Createl adhesive pen-loop. I can find no other problems, and if any show up, the folk at Spoonies are quick and friendly communicators, who will help in any way they can. Some people use apps to record symptoms; I do too. However, the very process of writing things down, analogue style – with our own favourite pen, in our own scribbly hand, making our own spelling mistakes – gives us a power over all those feelings that drench us every day. Saving a bundle of screen-clicks in a cloud somewhere just can’t do that. Writing is slow, it takes considerate thought… and that’s the point. So, why are you still reading this? Check out this diary + tracker. Read about Dom and Helene. Email and ask the society folk any questions. Then order one for yourself and one for a friend.

MD
16/12/2020
Mark D.
Australia Australia
A hybrid diary/symptom tracker? Why?

Why? Well, if you know, you know. If you’re reading this and you know about Spoonies, you probably already have some method of recording your symptoms. (I’ve used an ordinary diary (Faber Poetry Diary) for four years. Not ideal.) If you've not done it, tracking symptoms helps you recognise trends and identify triggers as well as providing a record to show your medical team. BUT – it also gives you a great outlet and a sense of control. Making an entry after a tough day then slamming the book shut, puts a lid on your nemesis. And if it’s been a great day, leaving that page open is like singing to the World! This diary/tracker is described as a “discreet A5 sized journal”. It may be discreet because it is a tasteful black or grey, with a large gold debossed Spoonies logo on the front and The Spoonies Society printed in gold on the spine. However, it is 3cm thick and weighs 770gms, so it’s not something to quickly slip into your hand/man bag when you’re off to the café. But it’s not designed for that. It may go with you on visits to your doctor, but mostly it will live at home. At first glance the price ($64 + shipping) seems expensive. It’s not. Compared to other journals of similar size and production quality, this journal is actually good value. Considering the excellent cover and binding quality, the 450-ish pages, the clear print on bright white paper and all the consideration involved in developing the charts, tables and data spaces, the price is very reasonable indeed. And then – it’s made in Australia! Inscope Books really have done a fine job with the Spoonies journal. It’s a solid book and will take a lot of use. Just as well, because it’s made to last for a whole year. Each entry point shows dates, but not days, so it can be used in any year, or if you buy it in April 2021, you can use it for the full twelve months into 2022. Each day has a full-page entry, and there are full month’s tracker summary charts and a calendar-type over-view. These latter sections are useful as summaries, but actually work to help you maintain daily entries – something that can be hard when you’re feeling low. Clear images of the pages are shown on the website. Importantly, when opened each double page lies flat (thank you Inscope binders), making it easy to write your entries. You don’t have to press the book open with one hand and scribble with the other. There are headings to guide you, but how you record is up to you. Use numbers, percentages, colour in boxes, etc. Writing in points keeps your record concise and clear to follow. It’s not hard to adapt a chart or data box if the heading doesn’t suit you, however, the designers seem to have thought of almost everything and taken into consideration the wide variety of Spoonies out there. As another reviewer mentioned, it may take some experimentation/tweeking to find the your own perfect method. Are there negatives? Just a few. The journal has a female slant, but this is subtle and will be no problem at all for males who need a symptom tracker. For instance, I will simply adapt the ************ tracker to something else. A thin ribbon bookmark bound in would be nice, even though there is a card bookmark supplied. The biggest issue for me – and it is probably not a problem for anyone else in the universe – is that the beautiful white paper is not fountain pen friendly. It soaks up ink like blotting paper and the bleed through is significant. I had thought of using bright coloured inks, but even the palest of inks shows through. So, I’ll be using a Pilot Frixion pen in light blue, which shows up beautifully against the grey-black print. I’ve attached it using an inexpensive Createl adhesive pen-loop. I can find no other problems, and if any show up, I know that the folk at Spoonies are quick and friendly communicators, who will help in any way they can. Some people use apps to record symptoms; I do too. However, the very process of writing things down, analogue style – with our own favourite pen, in our own scribbly hand, making our own spelling mistakes – gives us a power over all those feelings that drench us every day. Saving some screen-clicks in a cloud somewhere just can’t do that. Writing is slow, it takes considerate thought… and that’s the point. So, why are you still reading this? Go and check out this diary + tracker. Read about Dom and Helene. Email and ask the society folk any questions. Then order one for yourself and one for a friend.

JB
07/12/2020
Jennifer B.
Australia Australia
2nd Diary purchase.

I like & found mine so useful, I bought another 1 for a friend. She loves it & is very appreciative.

JB
22/11/2020
Jennifer B.
Australia Australia
Excellent tool, very useful

First up, let me confess, I'm not a bona fide 'Spoonie', I've got terminal breast cancer, but, I'm hearing & sympathizing with your experiences. It has taken me a bit of tweaking to make it work for me, but, work it does, like no other resource I have found thus far. I highly recommend this for anyone with ongoing health issues, whether terminal, chronic, or long term. It gives you the ability to record & track, in simple, clear & easy to access detail all what you need for your own record & more importantly, to inform your health team. It is empowering. Well done ladies for sharing so much of yourselves to help us all. Thank you.